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Home to the World's most active volcano, as well as Pele, the Hawaiian Goddess of Fire.

Since 1952, Kilauea has erupted 34 times, and has been erupting continuously since 1983.  

 

2100+ Fahrenheit Lava flows toward the sea through an underground ‘tube’ 

creating an explosive environment where it meets the water

 

Here's a 30-second exposure, showing lava entering the ocean (on right),
and surface flows up on the hill side (left).   Recently, I took a 9-hour roundtrip hike 

with my camera gear to get a closer look.  Below are some photos from that hike!

 

Here I go, beginning my nine-hour hike.

 

After getting soaked, I was rewarded with a spectacular rainbow!

 

After about three hours, I reached the far side of the roped off area.

 

From here, I had a great view of the plume and the lava

 

With my telephoto lens, I was able to get a better look at the action

 

Conditions seemed to change by the second. At some points, the lava appeared

completely surrounded.

 

Multiple lava entries appeared for a second.

 

This one shows a wave crashing on the newly-formed black sand beach

 

After hiking another three hours, I reached the lower flows on the hill side

 

Red-hot lava was just below the surface

 

This is one of my favorites, showing the lava oozing slowing as it hardens

 

Minutes later, it was completely dark... then I had a three hour trip back to the car

 

Here's a time exposure photo from another recent trip to the volcano. 

 

It was amazing watching the waves and lava joining each other.

 

Below are some more photos from throughout Volcanoes National Park:

 

Lava rock is glass-like in texture and color

 

Early Hawaiian Petroglyphs along the Pu’u Loa trail

 

Danger... what danger?

 

In 1988 lava permanently buried a nine mile stretch of the Chain of Craters road

 which once connected through to the Puna district

The 'vog' from the steam plume creates a mystical sunset

 

Sunset is a popular time to come witness the lava entering the Ocean.

 

Here's what most people see if they stay around just past sunset.  Its an awesome sight!

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